Help your school better support your adopted child this year

You’ve done it–your family has survived the first month back at school!  As a parent, you already know that children and teens who were adopted or are in foster care struggle with this time of year because it’s a transition, there are a lot of unknowns that cause anxiety, and it may be a separation from spending time at home with you.

Having worked for years providing therapy to children and teens, I know that it’s usually the one-month mark when I see parents start reaching out for therapy for their child or teen.  It’s around this time that kids are required to do more challenging academic work and they’ve already had several tests and quizzes.  Here in Charleston County, they are halfway to report cards and may already be worried and stressed about their grades.

If you haven’t already, now is the time to connect with your school to give them information about how to support your child throughout the school year.  Even the best educators can inadvertently make comments or assign projects that are upsetting for a child who was adopted or spent time in foster care if the educator hasn’t ever been given information about adoption.  Just being aware that certain topics or times-of-year are difficult for your child will help your teacher better understand changes in behavior and better intervene to lessen uncomfortable feelings that your child may experience.  This makes it better for everyone!

Bridgepointe Therapy has several resources on our website written by experts in the adoption field specifically for educators.  We also have a one-page School Counselor Tipsheet with considerations for supporting your child and a brief overview of how adoption may affect children at different stages of development.  Share these resources with your child’s teachers and school counselor.  To discuss getting started in therapy for your child or teen or to discuss ways that your school can better support your adopted child or teen, contact me for a consultation!